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76 mm HEAT Instructions

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"October 28th, 1942
Instructions for firing 76 mm HEAT rounds from the 76 mm regimental gun model 1927
  1. The BP-353A 76 mm HEAT made from gun iron is introduced into the ammunition loadouts of 76 mm regimental guns model 1927 to fire at tanks.
  2. The BP-353A HEAT shell is an effective method of fighting any known enemy tank. The most effective distance to fire this shell at is up to 500 meters. Firing at up to 1000 meters is permitted.
  3. The HEAT shell penetrates the following amount of armour:
    Range

    At 90 degrees

    At 60 degrees

    100

    60

    50-60

    1000

    60

    50-60

  4. A brief firing table for HEAT shells should be inscribed on gun shields.
  5. The HEAT shell is equipped with the K-6 fuse. Keep in mind that the fuse goes off when it hits armour but may not go off if it hits terrain.
  6. The HEAT shell can be distinguished from other 76 mm rounds by the designation BP-353A on the hull, three round grooves on the ogive part, and the fuse (the K-6 fuse is several times smaller than the KTM-1 fuse).
  7. Use the following firing table when using the HEAT shell.
    Scale: ChGD (new sight) or "HE grenade K fuse 290 m/s (old sight).
    Angle of incidence +18 mils
    Range

    Setting

    Trajectory height

    Time in flight

    Impact velocity

    Descent angle

    Deviation

    Divisions

    Mils

    Vertical

    Horizontal

    100

    4

    0

    0.1

    0.3

    287

    0.22

    0.0

    0.0

    200

    7

    6

    0.6

    0.7

    284

    0.44

    0.1

    0.1

    300

    10

    11

    1.4

    1.0

    281

    1.06

    0.2

    0.2

    400

    14

    17

    2.5

    1.4

    278

    1.28

    0.3

    0.3

    500

    17

    23

    3.9

    1.7

    275

    1.51

    0.4

    0.4

    600

    20

    29

    5.6

    2.1

    272

    2.14

    0.5

    0.4

    700

    23

    36

    7.6

    2.5

    269

    2.37

    0.6

    0.5

    800

    26

    42

    10

    2.9

    267

    3.0

    0.7

    0.6

    900

    29

    48

    13

    3.2

    264

    3.24

    0.8

    0.6

    1000

    32

    55

    16

    3.6

    261

    3.49

    0.9

    0.7

    Note: in addition to gun iron BP-353A rounds you may also encounter steel BP-353 rounds. Those can be distinguished by the label BP-353 and K-6 fuse.
    Steel rounds use the same firing tables as gun iron rounds.
  8. Until special unclassified instructions are published, supply gun batteries with excerpts from these instructions with the muzzle velocity and penetration.
    The first batches of ammunition will include memos regarding firing HEAT shells.
  9. The following labels are applied to the ammunition crates:
    1. On the front: 76-27 HEAT x5
    2. On the lid: "fire as instructed in the memo inside the crate"
  10. The propellant casing is marked UBP-353A or UBP-353.
  11. Study the effect of these shells thoroughly and report to the GAU.
Attachment: an example of the memo included in the crate.

Authorized representative of the GAU Chief and Artillery Committee Chair, Major General Hohlov
Military Commissar of the GAU, Regimental Commissar Vasilyev
Acting Chief of the 1st Department of the Artillery Committeem Engineer-Colonel Slukhotskiy."


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