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Tank Armies

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Despite its very young industry, the USSR was focused on building a large amount of tanks right off the bat. It might seem weird to focus on something like that so early on, but once you see the intelligence information at the army's disposal then everything falls into place.

This map maps the tank armies of European nations by the fall of 1931 (according to German sources). The data is as follows:
  • Sweden: 10 light "21" tanks
  • Finland: 32 Renault
  • Estonia:
    •  10 Renault
    • 4 Mk.V
  • Latvia:
    • 7 Renault
    • 10 Mk.V
  • Lithuania: 
    • 16 Renault FT
    • 12 Renault M.26
  • Poland:
    • 25 Char 2C
    • 100 Renault FT
    • 120 Renault M.27
    • 20 Renault NC-27
    • 10 "gas" Renault
    • 20 Mk.V
    • 5 A7V
    • 20 Carden-Loyd
    • 10 MP
  • Czechoslovakia:
    • 30 Renault
    • 50 convertible drive
  • Romania:
    • 75 Renault FT
    • 6 Schneider M.16
  • Yugoslavia:
    • 50 Renault FT
    • 20 Renault 27
  • Italy:
    • 100 Fiat
    • 40 10t Fiat 
  • England:
    • 20 heavy tanks
    • 100 Mk.V
    • 1 "heavy Vickers"
    • 25 SPGs
    • 220 light Vickers Mk.III
    • 10 light Mk.II
    • 5 light Mk.I
    • 200 Carden-Loyd
  • Belgium: 49 Renault FT
  • France: 
    • 2200 Renault 26
    • 1200 Renault radio
    • 1500 Renault NC-27 (by 1935)
    • 100 Mk.V*
    • 90 Char 2C
    • 10 (?) Char 3C or D
    • 20 Saint-Chamond
    • 62 Schneider-Lorraine
  • Spain:
    • 20 Renault FT
    • 5 Trubia 1925
    • 10 Schneider 16
In retrospect, of course, this map is terribly wrong. There were hardly hordes of French superheavy tanks wandering around in Europe, but that was the boogeyman of the time. 20 years later you see the exact same thing with IS-3 tanks reported everywhere in Korea, for instance. 

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